Zimmerman trial turns spotlight on another Florida self-defense case, By Susan Cooper Eastman


JACKSONVILLE, Florida (Reuters) – Three days after a Florida jury found George Zimmerman not guilty for the shooting death of Trayvon Martin, the Rev. Jesse Jackson visited Jacksonville to call attention to another self-defense case that he called a “travesty” of justice.

 

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 Jackson spent an hour in a jailhouse visit with Marissa Alexander, 32, an African American who was sentenced to a mandatory 20 years in prison for firing a warning shot into the wall of her home in 2010 to end a violent argument with her abusive husband.

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 “In one case Mr. Zimmerman kills a young man and walks away, free to kill again,” Jackson said. “And Marissa shot no one, hurt no one, and she’s in jail for 20 years.”

 Jackson said the contrast in the Zimmerman and Alexander cases exposed injustices in the justice system.

“We see radical racial polarization in the judicial system,” Jackson told the Florida Times-Union. “That’s a cause of great concern.”

MS MARISSA ALEXANDER, FLORIDA ATAND YOUR GROUND CASE

After meeting with Alexander, Jackson spoke with Angela Corey, the state prosecutor who handled both the Martin and the Alexander cases. Corey told him that Alexander’s case is in the appeal phase and out of her jurisdiction, but Jackson said he asked her to use her power to see that Alexander is released.

“Ours was a moral appeal,” he said. “This mother has three children. They need their mother,” he said, noting that Alexander had already served the three years originally offered to her by the state in a plea deal.

 

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 Michael Dowd, a New York domestic violence attorney handling Alexander’s appeal, contends she should not have been charged with felonies, but rather a misdemeanor, such as unlawful discharge of a gun.

Local leaders from the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and the National Action Network are calling for Florida Governor Rick Scott to pardon Alexander.

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ADLA Presents: History of Discrimination By Joseph Devine


Discrimination has a long history throughout the world.  Most societies, especially the larger ones, have practiced some form and some degree of discrimination.
In fact, a notable trend (though by no means necessarily an always true law) is that larger societies have had a larger propensity to discriminate.  Why?  Because of their achievements.  Larger societies, to reach the size that they were, had to accomplish.
They built extensive and complicated networks.  Their engineering was on a scale and level enough to support a large society.  Their art was complex.  They had a formal language and writing system.  All of these things were–and are–marvelous achievements.
But couple with them the fact that for most of human history, people lived only within their societies and had almost no contact with peoples of different societies, and it becomes easy to see why discrimination occurred.  They saw others as foreign and “backward,” not having accomplished as much as they did.
From a list of all of the societies that ever existed, it is easy to pick out societies that discriminated.  Spain used to discriminate heavily against the Jews, who were forced either to convert Catholicism or to leave Spain.  The Spanish also created a body–called the Inquisition–to persecute who were not like them.  So, people were persecuted for being Jews.  If someone was thought to be a witch, the she or he was also persecuted.  Likely, homosexuals were also persecuted.
In South Africa, Australia, and the Untied States, the black and indigenous populations have faced heavy persecution.
Jim Crow laws in the United States, intentionally imitated by South African and Australia, persecuted blacks.  Segregation was prevalent in all of these three countries.  Blacks were illegally prevented from voting.  Violence against blacks was common.
In the Untied States, the native American population faced heavy discrimination.  Their families were broken up, the children were forced to go schools that would eradicate their culture, and families were forced to abandon their original ways of life and live on reservations.
Fortunately, the world as a whole is less tolerant of discrimination today than it was in the past.  Most nations have laws barring most, if not all, forms of discrimination (discrimination based on sexual orientation is an exception, though, and still faces a lot discrimination across the world).
One specific barring of discrimination in the U.S. involves employment practices.  Employers are prevented by the law from discriminating against employees or potential employees (during interviews).
If you feel you have been a victim of any sort of work place discrimination, contact the Orange County Employment Discrimination Lawyers of Perry Smith by visiting their website or by calling 888-356-2529.
By
Joseph Devine

IF YOU ARE A PERSON OF AFRICAN DESCENT, ANCESTRY OR HAS AN AFRICAN BLOOD (NO MATTER HOW MUCH IS THE PERCENTAGE) AND HAVE BEEN DISCRIMINATED AGAINST OR DEFAMED,  “ANTI-DEFAMATION LEAGUE OF AFRICA, (ADLA)” WILL  HELP YOU IN EVERY WAY THAT YOU NEED THEM.

PLEASE VISIT THEIR WEBSITE AND JOIN THEM TO GET HELP:

http://www.myspace.com/adla_africa