ADLA Presents: History of Discrimination By Joseph Devine


Discrimination has a long history throughout the world.  Most societies, especially the larger ones, have practiced some form and some degree of discrimination.
In fact, a notable trend (though by no means necessarily an always true law) is that larger societies have had a larger propensity to discriminate.  Why?  Because of their achievements.  Larger societies, to reach the size that they were, had to accomplish.
They built extensive and complicated networks.  Their engineering was on a scale and level enough to support a large society.  Their art was complex.  They had a formal language and writing system.  All of these things were–and are–marvelous achievements.
But couple with them the fact that for most of human history, people lived only within their societies and had almost no contact with peoples of different societies, and it becomes easy to see why discrimination occurred.  They saw others as foreign and “backward,” not having accomplished as much as they did.
From a list of all of the societies that ever existed, it is easy to pick out societies that discriminated.  Spain used to discriminate heavily against the Jews, who were forced either to convert Catholicism or to leave Spain.  The Spanish also created a body–called the Inquisition–to persecute who were not like them.  So, people were persecuted for being Jews.  If someone was thought to be a witch, the she or he was also persecuted.  Likely, homosexuals were also persecuted.
In South Africa, Australia, and the Untied States, the black and indigenous populations have faced heavy persecution.
Jim Crow laws in the United States, intentionally imitated by South African and Australia, persecuted blacks.  Segregation was prevalent in all of these three countries.  Blacks were illegally prevented from voting.  Violence against blacks was common.
In the Untied States, the native American population faced heavy discrimination.  Their families were broken up, the children were forced to go schools that would eradicate their culture, and families were forced to abandon their original ways of life and live on reservations.
Fortunately, the world as a whole is less tolerant of discrimination today than it was in the past.  Most nations have laws barring most, if not all, forms of discrimination (discrimination based on sexual orientation is an exception, though, and still faces a lot discrimination across the world).
One specific barring of discrimination in the U.S. involves employment practices.  Employers are prevented by the law from discriminating against employees or potential employees (during interviews).
If you feel you have been a victim of any sort of work place discrimination, contact the Orange County Employment Discrimination Lawyers of Perry Smith by visiting their website or by calling 888-356-2529.
By
Joseph Devine

IF YOU ARE A PERSON OF AFRICAN DESCENT, ANCESTRY OR HAS AN AFRICAN BLOOD (NO MATTER HOW MUCH IS THE PERCENTAGE) AND HAVE BEEN DISCRIMINATED AGAINST OR DEFAMED,  “ANTI-DEFAMATION LEAGUE OF AFRICA, (ADLA)” WILL  HELP YOU IN EVERY WAY THAT YOU NEED THEM.

PLEASE VISIT THEIR WEBSITE AND JOIN THEM TO GET HELP:

http://www.myspace.com/adla_africa

Advertisements

Hello world!


Hello:

Thank you for visiting the official blog site for ANTI-DEFAMATION LEAGUE OF AFRICA, (ADLA) New York City, World Headquarters.

It is part of WORLD FEDERATION OF AFRICA, WAFED, the governing body of Africa and Africans globally.

STATUS:

ADLA is not yet operational.

We’re still in the phase of laying the foundation.

When it is operational, it will be announced publicly.

PURPOSE AND MISSION:

ADLA was created to address various local, national and international problems that both the individual person of African ancestry or descent and also the countries have in dealing with people and countries globally, that are non-African, hostile, racist, discrimnatory and exploitative.

ADLA would specifically address, investigate, protest, campaign against, mitigate and stop all defamations, slanders, discrimination, racial profiling, brutality, human trafficking and slavery, bigotry, hypocrisy, calumny, malice, hatred and antogonism by the hostile and racist media, writers, authors, politicians, movie producers, corporate ad campaigns, non-profit organizations, police departments, journalists, reporters, TV News Networks, Cable TV Networks, movies, documentaries,  videos, articles, advertisements, research reports, policies, programs, individuals, organizations, associations, groups, schools, universities and others in every country of the world that are hostile, derogatory, defamatory, demeaning, degrading, discriminatory  towards Africa, Africans, and every person of African ancestry/descent/nationality or friends of Africa or anyone who is directly or indirectly connected to Africa and Africans.

ADLA would inform, guide, defend and protect Africa, Africans, and every person of African ancestry/descent/nationality or friends of Africa or anyone who is directly or indirectly related or connected to Africa and Africans or doing business with Africa or Africans or has any interest in Africa and Africans, no matter their ancestries, races, ethnicities or nationalities and help them to solve any social, economic, political and legal problems that they may have.

TRUE MEANING OF RACISM HAS BEEN MISUNDERSTOOD AND CORRUPTED

ANTI-DEFAMATION LEAGUE OF AFRICA, ADLA don’t believe that anyone who dislikes Africa or Africans is automatically a racist. That will be watering down the sinister evil that is racism. Many people that are considered racists are actually not. They are just hateful people. Hate is a feeling and it is relative. That alone is not racism because it is a common feeling among all human beings. When hatred is coupled with actions to promote one’s race at the expense of another race or when a person discriminates/hurts/harms/kills/ another person from another race  or due to the color of his/her skin which is different, then it will be safe to call that racism.

CHAIRMAN BENNEY IKOKWU, ADLA AFRICA